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Montserrat Caballé – “E Sara … Vivi ingrato … Quel sangue versato” Final Scene of “Roberto Devereux” – Gaetano Donizetti (1797 – 1848)

by Luca

Montserrat Caballé – “E Sara … Vivi ingrato … Quel sangue versato” Final Scene of “Roberto Devereux” – Gaetano Donizetti (1797 – 1848).
LIVE in Venice 1972 (?).

“Represented for the first time at the Teatro di San Carlo, Napoli, October 28, 1837, this serious opera in three acts is the last composed by Donizetti for Miss Ronzi, soprano, and where she sang. The number of roles for Miss Ronzi – Fausta, Sancia, Maria Stuarda, Gemma di Vergy, and Elisabeth I Tudor in ‘Roberto Devereux’ – reflects the intensification of collaboration between singer and composer. Miss Ronzi was an interpreter of uncommon artistic value, Donizetti greatly admired this soprano, in spite of her aggressive character and her portly appearance.” (William Ashbrook)

Giuseppina Ronzi de Begnis (January 11, 1800 – June 7, 1853) was an Italian operatic soprano, one of the leading sopranos of her time, particularly associated with Donizetti roles.
Born Giuseppina Ronzi in Milan, she studied with Pierre Garat and made her debut in Bologna in 1816, also appearing in Genoa, Florence, Bergamo. Her career took off at the Théâtre-Italien in Paris during the 1819-20 season, where she appeared as Susanna, Carolina, Rosina, and Fiorilla. In 1822, she went to London, where she obtained brilliant successes at the King’s Theatre, notably in La donna del lago and Matilde di Shabran. She returned to Italy in 1825, and was engaged at the San Carlo in Naples, where she also won considerable acclaim.
She was considered the best Donna Anna next to Henriette Sontag, and the best Norma after Giuditta Pasta, and created the leading roles in five operas by Gaetano Donizetti: “Fausta”, “Sancia di Castiglia”, “Maria Stuarda”, “Gemma di Vergy”, and “Roberto Devereux.”
She was married to Italian bass Giuseppe de Begnis (1793–1849). She retired from the stage shortly after his death. She died in Florence, aged 53.

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